On Thursday and Friday, November 28th and 29th, I went to Naba Milano for the “Matter of Identity seminar week”.

A week dedicated to workshops on different meanings that identity has for each one of us. The workshop took place during two days, in which I was able to meet some students of the Institute, students that had consciously chosen to participate in my workshop. Seeing people who didn’t know each other opened up with each other and with me in just two days was a huge joy, I love working with groups, especially when they are multicultural.

The students came indeed from different countries, but this has not being a problem. It is possible to communicate anyway, with a language that we all know or have within us: creativity. Obviously English also helped!

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The two days of workshops were very intense, started and finished with a simple question to the participants: “how are you?” This is a way to try living in the present, because if we think about how we really are in this moment we will not live in the past or in the future, but we will fully enjoy what we have and what we feel right now.

With a new awareness of our emotions of the present moment we have faced at best all the phases of the workshop.

All the exercises were aimed to discover our authenticity and try to understand ourselves better.

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A first exercise was about expressing our emotions with the left hand, in order to activate the right side of the brain, the irrational mind, our creativity center.

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It was then asked to the students to choose a companion and exchange the drawing so that the other person could add something to their illustration.

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After each exercise there is always a moment of sharing: our emotions, how we felt during the exercise, how was the relationship. Supported by our drawings, our creativity becomes a precious tool to learn more about ourselves.

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Another exercise, always in pairs, involved bandaging or being blindfolded and then leading or being led. An eye mask was given to one person of the couple and the other person had to guide the blindfolded outside, making them touch and discover all the objects present.

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When we returned to the classroom, we dedicated time to ourselves, feeling ourselves in full, understanding our body and then representing it on paper, with a drawing.

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After another moment of sharing in pairs we arrived at the moment of feedback, not judgment. It is very difficult to understand the difference between feedback and judgment.

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Through creativity we have learned to enter into our deepest emotions and not to make judgments, everyone has their own truth that cannot be right or wrong. During the groups, in fact, I have only two rules: the first one is that everything that happens in the group remains in the group and the second is the abstention from judgment.